Quote
"

Q: Can you talk a bit about what it was like being a woman at MIT during that time?

A: I think I was in the first big co-ed class. There had been women at MIT for … forever, I’d have to check.

"

The First Woman to Get a Ph.D. in Computer Science From MIT - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

What’s funny about this quote is that she graduated MIT in the 60s/70s. I graduated from MIT 35 years later and they said the same thing about my class: it was the first big co-ed class.

Audio

jenniferjenkins:

Don’t skip this one.

These tears I cry sure won’t be the last
They will not be the last, no
This pain inside never seems to pass
It never seems to pass me by

So I thank you
Said I thank you
Yes I thank you
For making me a woman

Quote
"The best project you’ll ever work on is you."

Sonny Franco (via bobbycaputo)

(Source: psych-facts, via michelleakin)

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LOVE!

LOVE!

(Source: oscarprgirl)

Video

love.

(Source: youtube.com)

Video

How Far Is Too Far To Go When Dating?


My life standards in this area are pretty high. Some would say this is foolish. I value the peace of mind.

(Source: youtube.com)

Video

Yeah
As a shorty playing in the front yard of the crib
Fell down, and I bumped my head
Somebody helped me up and asked me if I bumped my head
I said “Yeah”
So then they said “Oh so that mean we gon, you gon switch it on em’?”
I said “Yeah, Flipmode, Flipmode is the greatest”
Knowing as a shorty, I was always told
That if I ain’t gon’ be part of the greatest
I gotta be the greatest myself

(Source: youtube.com)

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Best falsies tutorial I’ve ever seen on youtube. 

(Source: itsmyrayeraye)

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Oooh this couch…

Oooh this couch…

(Source: sugarcubebasics, via no-place-like-home)

Text

jenniferjenkins:

When you’re a public figure, there are rules. Here’s one: A public personality can be black, talented, or arrogant, but he can’t be any more than two of these traits at a time. It’s why antics and soundbites from guys like Brett Favre, Johnny Football and Bryce Harper seem almost hyper-American, capable of capturing the country’s imagination, but black superstars like Richard Sherman, Floyd Mayweather, and Cam Newton are seen as polarizing, as selfish, as glory boys, as distasteful and perhaps offensive.

It’s why we recoil at Kanye West’s rants, like when West, one of the greatest musical minds of our generation, had the audacity to publicly declare himself a genius (was this up for debate?), and partly why, over the six years of Barack Obama’s presidency, a noisy, obstreperous wing of the GOP has seemed perpetually on the cusp of calling him “uppity.” Barry Bonds at his peak was black, talented, and arrogant; he was a problem for America. Joe Louis was black, talented, and at least outwardly humble; he was “a credit to his race, the human race,” as Jimmy Cannon once wrote.

All this is based on the common, very American belief that black males must know their place, and more tellingly, that their place is somewhere different than that of whites. It’s been etched into our cultural fabric that to act as anything but a loud, yet harmless buffoon or an immensely powerful, yet humble servant is overstepping. It’s uppity. It is, as Fox Sports’s Kayla Knapp tweeted last night, petrifying.

— Deadspin on Richard Sherman